About the LTB

The Landlord and Tenant Board (LTB) resolves:

disputes between residential landlords and tenants
eviction applications filed by non-profit housing co-operatives

The LTB also provides information about its practices and procedures and the rights and responsibilities of landlords and tenants under the Residential Tenancies Act.

The LTB is one of the eight tribunals that make up Social Justice Tribunals Ontario (SJTO).

Some Common Questions:


1. Second-hand smoke (cannabis or tobacco) from a neighbour is bothering me. What can I do?

Your neighbours can smoke in their private homes, unless they signed a lease or there are condominium bylaws that say they can't. However, if second-hand smoke (tobacco or marijuana) from another unit is interfering with the reasonable enjoyment of your home, speak to your landlord.

If your landlord cannot resolve this issue, you can apply to the LTB using a T2: Application about Tenant Rights. You will be asked to show how the other tenant's behaviour is clearly interfering with your reasonable enjoyment. The LTB determines each application on a case-by-case basis.


2. What is happening with my hearing during the COVID-19 outbreak?

The LTB is postponing all in-person hearings. Where feasible, in-person hearings will be rescheduled to telephone or written hearings. If you have a scheduled hearing, the LTB will send you updated information soon as possible.

If you have questions about your hearing date, email your LTB regional office, or contact the LTB call centre at 1-888-332-3234 or 416 645-8080. For TTY relay service, dial 1-800-855-0511.

3. Which application should I file?

If you are not sure which application to file and:

you are a landlord, go to Help for Landlords
you are a tenant, go to Help for Tenants

If you are a non-profit housing co-op or a co-op member, see Non-Profit Co-op Evictions.

Get more information about the application and hearing process.


4. How often can a landlord increase the rent?


The landlord can increase the rent once every 12 months. The landlord has to give the tenant a 90 day written notice of the increase. There are some exemptions to these rules, for example tenants paying rent-geared-to-income in a social housing unit.

5. How much can a landlord legally increase the rent this year?


In most cases, a landlord can usually only increase a tenant's rent by the guideline set each year by the Ministry of Housing. See the brochure: 2018 Rent Increase Guideline.

6. If a tenant is late with their rent, what can the landlord do?


If a tenant does not pay rent on the date that it is due, the landlord can give the tenant a Notice to End a Tenancy Early for Non-payment of Rent the day after the rent was due. If a tenant pays rent monthly, this notice gives the tenant 14 days to pay the rent due or to move out. If the rent is not paid, and the tenant does not move, the landlord can apply to the LTB for an order that:

requires the tenant to pay the rent that is owing, and
evicts the tenant if they do not make the entire payment by a deadline.

If a tenant is often late with the rent, the landlord can give a Notice to Terminate a Tenancy at the End of Term. Daily or weekly tenants must be given notice 28 days before the end of their lease or rental period. In all other cases, the tenant must be given notice 60 days before the end of their lease or rental period.

The landlord can apply to the LTB for an order evicting the tenant right after giving the tenant the Notice to Terminate a Tenancy at the End of Term. A hearing will be held and both sides will have a chance to give their side of the story.

For more information, see the brochure: If a Tenant Does Not Pay Rent.


7. What should I do if repairs are needed to my building or unit?


Talk to your landlord first about the problems. Put the problems in writing and give the list to the landlord or the person who takes care of maintenance (for example, to the superintendent or property manager).

If the landlord refuses to do the repairs or you think that the landlord is taking too long to deal with the problems, see the brochure: Maintenance and Repairs.


8. How can I end my tenancy during the COVID-19 pandemic?

You must provide a written notice to your landlord at least 60 days before the last day of your rental period, or of your lease.

If you move out of your rental unit without giving notice or without giving proper notice (for example, fewer than the required number of days), you may be responsible for paying rent until the earlier of these two dates:

The date the unit is rented to another tenant
The earliest termination date that could have been put in a notice to end a tenancy, if you gave proper notice.

If a tenant agreed to rent the unit for a specific period of time, the tenant cannot terminate the tenancy before the period ends, unless:

The tenant and landlord agree
The tenant assigns the tenancy and the unit to someone else
The LTB issues an order ending the tenancy agreement early.

For more information please refer to the LTB brochure on How a Tenant Can End Their Tenancy or the FAQs. You can also reach the LTB at 1-888-332-3234 or 416-645-8080. For TTY relay service, dial 1-800-855-0511.


9. How can I end my tenancy during the COVID-19 pandemic?

You must provide a written notice to your landlord at least 60 days before the last day of your rental period, or of your lease.

If you move out of your rental unit without giving notice or without giving proper notice (for example, fewer than the required number of days), you may be responsible for paying rent until the earlier of these two dates:

The date the unit is rented to another tenant
The earliest termination date that could have been put in a notice to end a tenancy, if you gave proper notice.

If a tenant agreed to rent the unit for a specific period of time, the tenant cannot terminate the tenancy before the period ends, unless:

The tenant and landlord agree
The tenant assigns the tenancy and the unit to someone else
The LTB issues an order ending the tenancy agreement early.

For more information please refer to the LTB brochure on How a Tenant Can End Their Tenancy or the FAQs. You can also reach the LTB at 1-888-332-3234 or 416-645-8080. For TTY relay service, dial 1-800-855-0511.


10. Who is covered by the Residential Tenancies Act (RTA)?

The Residential Tenancies Act, 2006 (RTA) covers most residential rental units in Ontario including mobile homes, care homes and rooming and boarding houses. However, there are situations where a rental unit is not covered.

For example, the RTA does not apply:

if the tenant must share a kitchen or bathroom with the owner, or the owner's family members
if the unit is used on a seasonal or temporary basis

Many of the provisions and protections in the RTA about rent do not apply to:

non-profit and public housing
university and college residences

Most of the other provisions and protections, like the ones about maintenance and the reasons for eviction, do apply. The RTA does not apply to commercial tenancies.

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